2023 Smart Growth Summit

For more than 25 years, Vision Long Island has made a huge difference in our communities, connecting great people and generally helping all sorts of folks wrap their heads around the challenges and opportunities to improve our built environment on LI. Their 2023 Smart Growth Summit is happening Friday, December 1, 2023 from 8am-4pm.
 
It will feature over 1,000 local community, business and government, downtown revitalization and community development leaders. There will be nearly 20 workshops, 100 speakers, a trade show, and a concurrent Youth Summit. The breakfast “State of the Towns and Villages” session and luncheon alone are worth the program price. 
 
This is a great way to get an in depth, inside scoop on important local issues, including infrastructure, redevelopment, energy, human needs, small business, walkability, transportation and many others.
 
The LI Smart Growth movement generally attracts great people who care about the future of our communities. For an idea of the quality of folks who attend, check out these in-depth interviews hosted by Eric Alexander featuring a broad range of local leaders. You can also check out Vision’s YouTube channel to see important discussions they’ve hosted in the past, as well as people, projects and policies that they have highlighted. 
 
It’s really valuable stuff. Best to come check out what they’re talking about now!
 
Check out their website for details and get on their email list!

2023 Smart Growth Awards

Smart Growth Awards Logo

For over 20 years Vision Long Island has been honoring individuals, organizations, and projects that advance the growth of our downtowns and infrastructure. Specific focus areas include transit oriented development, affordable housing, environmental sustainability, traffic calming, transportation enhancements, clean energy and community based planning.

Continue reading

FMC Folio Awards!

FMC Folio Awards flyer. Info below.

Fair Media Council Folio Awards

The Folio Awards, run by our sponsor The Fair Media Council, recognizes the best in news and social media. National and New York regional news of any topic may be entered, along with LI hyperlocal news stories. Social media submissions may come from anywhere to educate, inspire, or enlighten.

This event is excellent networking — They really do bring together the best in media and public relations, as well as a whole host of local notables.

Folio Awards Event Details

The event will be held at the historic stone Beaux Arts building known as the West Bath House on Jones Beach, which was restored and opened in 2019. Weather permitting, networking will be outdoors, overlooking the ocean with luncheon and awards inside. Be a part of it:
 
When: Friday, June 23rd from 11am-2pm
Where: Gatsby on the Ocean, Jones Beach.
To Register: Visit the FMC Website
Sponsorship Opportunities Available.

Special Awards

In addition to honoring the best in news and social media, the program will include the following special salute to news legends and legacies:
 
Distinguished Achievement Awards:
 
Garden City News — in commemoration of its 100th anniversary
WABC-TV — in commemoration of its 75th anniversary
WNET — in commemoration of its 75th anniversary
PIX11 — in commemoration of its 75th anniversary
Long Island Business News — in commemoration of its 70th anniversary
 
Lifetime Achievement Awards:
 
National news: Pat Milton, Senior Producer, CBS News Investigative Unit
Regional news: Tim Scheld, News & Programming Director, CBS Newsradio 880 (recently retired)
Hyperlocal news: Danielle Campbell, long-time anchor, News 12 Long Island (recently retired) 
Hyperlocal news: Doug Geed, anchor and one of the original staff from 1986, News 12 Long Island (retiring in July) 

About the Fair Media Council

The Fair Media Council has a multi-pronged mission that essentially works to advance quality journalism, and to help people become more discerning and better understand the media landscape. Their Member Benefits are valuable. You can also Subscribe to their Award-Winning Podcast, which engages notable guests in profound, informative conversation. It’s information you can use.

 

FMC Folio Awards Ad Deadline Approaching!

Fair Media Council Logo

Fair Media Council Folio Awards

The Folio Awards, run by our sponsor The Fair Media Council, recognizes the best in news and social media. National and New York regional news of any topic may be entered, along with LI hyperlocal news stories. Social media submissions may come from anywhere to educate, inspire, or enlighten.

This event is excellent networking — They really do bring together the best in media and public relations, as well as a whole host of local notables.

Folio Awards Event Details

The event will be held at the historic stone Beaux Arts building known as the West Bath House on Jones Beach, which was restored and opened in 2019. Weather permitting, networking will be outdoors, overlooking the ocean with luncheon and awards inside. Be a part of it:
 
When: Friday, June 23rd from 11am-2pm
Where: Gatsby on the Ocean, Jones Beach.
To Register: Visit the FMC Website
Sponsorship and Ad Opportunities Available.

The beautiful Folio Magazine does sell out, so it is strongly recommended you reserve your space ASAP. s

Special Awards

In addition to honoring the best in news and social media, the program will include the following special salute to news legends and legacies:
 
Distinguished Achievement Awards:
 
Garden City News — in commemoration of its 100th anniversary
WABC-TV — in commemoration of its 75th anniversary
WNET — in commemoration of its 75th anniversary
PIX11 — in commemoration of its 75th anniversary
Long Island Business News — in commemoration of its 70th anniversary
 
Lifetime Achievement Awards:
 
National news: Pat Milton, Senior Producer, CBS News Investigative Unit
Regional news: Tim Scheld, News & Programming Director, CBS Newsradio 880 (recently retired)
Hyperlocal news: Danielle Campbell, long-time anchor, News 12 Long Island (recently retired) 
Hyperlocal news: Doug Geed, anchor and one of the original staff from 1986, News 12 Long Island (retiring in July) 

About the Fair Media Council

The Fair Media Council has a multi-pronged mission that essentially works to advance quality journalism, and to help people become more discerning and better understand the media landscape. Their Member Benefits are valuable. You can also Subscribe to their Award-Winning Podcast, which engages notable guests in profound, informative conversation. It’s information you can use.

 

Complete Streets Summit – Let’s Do This!!!

Presser for the 2023 Complete Streets Summit. Photo by Katheryn Laible

Complete Streets Summit

The 2023 Complete Streets Summit recently convened by Vision Long Island was powerful and informative. This is an important annual event that brings local stakeholders together to address the tragic reality that Long Island has the deadliest roads in New York State, and to recognize the incredible potential we have to not only make our streets safer, but to make them healthier and more pleasant for our people, our environment, and our economy.

For the last 25 years, Vision has brought together folks who are passionate about community service; who care about better understanding their context, and who are willing to work together with others to make a positive difference in our built environment. At their events, there are always those who have taken great joy in being involved for years, and people whose faces are alight to be experiencing this group for the first time.

A big challenge Vision has is getting people to be quiet while the program is in progress. This is not due to lack of interest. In fact, the murmur often relates to the content. It happens because the relationships nurtured here are deep and valued. Folks are so happy to see each other, to catch up and to see how best to connect.

Those engaged cover fairly diverse sectors, perspectives, and walks of life. What they tend to share are fundamental values and care for this Island we call home.

Photo of presentation at the Complete Streets Summit. Vision Director of Operations Tawaun Whitty is speaking

The Tragedy is Real

I have always cared passionately about safe, inviting streets that are designed to serve human beings and that respect their broader environment. This year, though, the event hit closer to home.

I haven’t been able to stop thinking about Benjamin Daggart, a 16-year-old who went to my kids’ school, Benjamin suffered for two weeks before passing away after being struck down on South Oyster Bay Rd. while riding his bicycle to work at 10:45 on a Sunday morning.

He was not the only person I heard of lately who got hit, nor the only one who suffered for weeks before dying.

Surely. we can do better.

Benjamin was not the only person I heard of lately who got hit, nor the only one who suffered for weeks before dying. Surely. we can do better.

It's About Basic Quality of Life

At the event, I ran into Jorge Martinez, a longtime trustee of the Village of Freeport, business owner, and friend of Vision LI, who now serves an organization called The Age Friendly Center of Excellence. You can see a great interview of their leadership team with Vision Long Island here.

“You know,” he said, “being suitable for all ages isn’t just about the elderly, though that’s really important. It’s about our kids and their families, too.”

“Nassau County, in fact, is great in many ways,” he continued, “It hits six of the eight requirements for being considered an age-friendly community. The two it fails at are big ones, though.”

“Let me guess,” I responded, “Walkability/Transportation and Affordable Housing.”

He smiled grimly and nodded.

These are indeed key details.

“Nassau County, in fact, is great in many ways. It hits four of the six requirements for being considered an age-friendly community. The two it fails at are big ones, though”

Walkability/Transportation and Affordable Housing.

People Are Doing Something. Help Them.

I am grateful the folks of Vision persist at working with anyone who will engage to figure out how to solve our biggest challenges as a region, while operating fundamentally at the community level. I’m even more grateful that, each time around, more people seem on hand to listen hard, make connections and report on progress.

Ever human-focused, Vision’s work is incredibly down to Earth. Federal and state funding and other initiative are great, and they are a force at that level, but those regional solutions are really only as good as the local stakeholders who help shape and apply them. Our local elected officials live and raise their families here, care for their parents here, and more often than not work in the private sector here as well. It is these folks who know our communities and who roll up their sleeves and work with local civic groups to make things happen. Here.

We used to be grateful to have a roomful of people who cared. For years now, they have had roomfuls of people who are experienced and have real progress to share.

Stakeholders armed with markers and aerial views of well known streets considering the traffic engineering

Progress is Happening. More is Needed. Opportunities Abound.

Just imagine: Hopping on a bicycle and safely riding to the beach. Imagine not having to drive somewhere to bicycle safely. Imagine being able to get where you need to go without having to get in your car.

It’s possible. For many, often in the most dangerous places of all, it’s a necessity.

There was rich technical data offered by Elissa Kyle of Vision Long Island and Robert Nalewajk of GPI. There were resources available, and models to learn from.

Folks had much to report, including Daniel Flanzig of Flanzig & Flanzig LLC, Rosemary Mascali of US Green Building Council and Carter Strickland of the Trust for Public Land. It was noted that many walking audits have occurred. People from all walks of life came to testify how important safe streets are to them and what they’re prepared to do about it.

Over the last 20 years, about 40 projects have been undertaken. Legislation has been passed and funding has been dedicated, including at the State and Federal levels. There were over 150 stakeholders present at this Complete Streets Summit, including 18 elected leaders. Thoughts on how best to do things continue to evolve, as more and more models are springing up that are local and inspiring.

This is progress, but it is not enough.

Still, it is refreshingly cross-political, multi-perspective and thoughtful.

Dan Burden with Vision Assistant Director Tawaun Whitty

The Return of Johnny Appleseed

This year, we even got a visit from the Johnny Appleseed of Walkability himself, Dan Burden. Dan was one of Vision’s first inspirations and seemed honestly excited about the progress we’ve made in the 20 years since he last worked here seriously. He was impressed by the quality of those gathered. This is good, because making things better requires a great cross-section of stakeholders as isolated successes only go so far when the challenges are systemic and mounting.

We need this. People overwhelmingly want this. Let’s do it already.

Dan is over 80 years old, now, not that you’d know it to look at him. His presentations are based on lots of data, cutting edge engineering, and interesting models. Some of what he explains is counter intuitive in the best of ways. It’s very technical and deeply researched. At core, though, it’s simple.

Dan’s message is grounded in human values. As he was quoted in Newsday, “If we built what we value — we care about kids, we care about ourselves and our elders — then we will start making the right decisions.”

We reflected on those values, and considered the data. We then applied that information to real-world examples and thought about how we might make those places healthier.

In the end, folks stood together and brought it all home.

It was a hopeful day. I am grateful.

Thanks.

Here is the Presser from the Vision Long Island Complete Streets Summit

The run-up in LI Business News

Coverage in Newsday

At core, it’s simple. Dan’s message is grounded in human values. As he was quoted in Newsday, “If we built what we value — we care about kids, we care about ourselves and our  elders — then we will start making the right decisions.”

 

Let’s do this.

21st Annual Smart Growth Awards: LIVE and In-Person!

Smart Growth Awards Logo

For over 20 years Vision Long Island has been honoring individuals, organizations, and projects that advance the growth of our downtowns and infrastructure. Specific focus areas include transit oriented development, affordable housing, environmental sustainability, traffic calming, transportation enhancements, clean energy and community based planning.

Continue reading

Happy New Year! Thank You, Friends for these End of Year Resources!

Photo of sparkler with heart shaped core by Katheryn Laible

Photo “New Year’s Love” by Katheryn Laible

Happy New Year! We thought you might appreciate the following:
 
Let’s start with this fascinating piece on the history of New Year’s and its traditions from History.com
 
Then, let’s reflect on our own recent history. Here’s a blog post on a 7-Step Year in Review from Strength Leader Deb Ingino to help guide us! Deb is great at quickly boiling things down to key takeaways. Here, she picks a particularly timely nugget out of a great podcast from John C. Maxwell, while offering the link to his full 7 steps. I found it well worth carving out time for!
 
Many of us are still doing year-end giving! Today, my dear friend Nancy brought this New York Times newsletter: A giving guide to my attention. There’s a lot of useful stuff in here. As we might expect, it offers resources from a much more global viewpoint than we do, but also noted that LOCAL giving — including to local news sources —  is really important.
 
Along those lines…this piece written with David Okorn of the Long Island Community Foundation,“Foundations for the Common Good — A Call to Action” remains timely. If you want to quick-update it to account for the impacts of the last few years, just underline the sense of urgency in triplicate. The article explains growing holes in the LI safety net and how we might fill them. It also shares how the LI Community Foundation itself helps givers make the best use of their philanthropic dollars, as well as how it serves issues they’ve identified as critical directly.
 
Here’s a list of JUST A FEW incredible local organizations that could use our support...use it as a starter guide. We look forward to sharing many more in the New Year!
 
We’re also going to keep repeating this: The idea that a not for profit organization should be judged primarily by the % going to admin and fundraising is just plain wrong! Find out why in this article written with Marian Conway of the NY Community Bank Foundation: “Stop the Nonprofit Budget Fantasy. It’s Not Right!”  Marian’s run a foundation for years and in one way or another served and studied countless organizations. She literally has a Ph.D awarded for her dissertation on “What are the general operating expenses for nonprofits and who pays them.” She knows what she’s talking about. Please listen to her!!!
 
Finally, New Year – New Beginnings. Let’s talk a little bit about resolutions. Considering joining the Dry January tradition? Dr. Jeffery Reynolds, CEO of Family & Children’s Association has some great tips that I think can also be applied to helping follow through on other pledges, especially when paired with this good advice from Forbes.com on how to actually keep your resolutions.
 
Among mine, resolutions tend to involve committing to lifelong learning and development. Toward that end, I find the Farnam Street Newsletter to be something I regularly open and intend to dig more deeply into next year. This week, among other things, they offered snippets from their most downloaded podcasts. As for just a few favorite sources of local guidance, I really appreciate the Fair Media Council channel on YouTube, and everything Vision Long Island puts on its Vimeo.
 
I also resolve to more deeply appreciate our wonderful local treasures. Thank you, Cindy Mardenfeld, for sharing this Newsday article on the membership perks of Long Island attractions(it’s Newsday, so, please forgive the paywall). It covers all sorts of great museums, theaters, kids places and parks. The best part is knowing they’ve hardly scratched the surface!
 
Let me know your year-end reflections and resources, and what you’d like to see focused on in 2022. Thanks!!!