Grand Openings! Congrats to all Involved with the Cinema Arts Centre and the Half Hollow Hills Community Library!

Photo by Myriam Zilles on Unsplash

Grand Openings of Wonderful Things! Photo by Myriam Zilles on Unsplash

Congratulations to Dylan Skolnick, Charlotte, Skye, the full CAC Membership and the entire film-loving community on the grand reopening of the Cinema Arts Centre! It all began back in the early 1970’s with two movie buffs, some friends, a sheet and a reel-to-reel projector. Now, a full generation or so later, there are 10,000 members and approximately 150,000 attendees per year at this very special theater.
The CAC offers “compelling American and international films, restored classics as well as entertaining popular films, adventurous and cutting edge films and a remarkable array of monthly film series, often coordinated with music, art exhibits and more. Educational programming includes workshops in screen-writing and filmmaking.”
There’s really nothing else like it. We are so glad to see it’s doors reopened! Read about the theater and its renovation in Huntington Now, TBR News Media. Newsday (subscription required), and LI Business News (subscription required)
 
Congratulations dear friend, Helen Crosson, Board and Staff, and everyone involved in the Half Hollow Hills community on the grand opening of your new library! The brand-new, forward-looking, $24.7M Half Hollow Hills Community Library is located at 55 Vanderbilt Motor Parkway in Dix Hills. Here’s a sampling of press regarding the achievement, including the Half Hollow Hills Community Library’s own updates over the years. This is the SECOND library Helen has had a major hand in spearheading. Here is a past article about Helen, written back when this whole latest chapter started. You may also be interested in our tribute to America’s Public Libraries and great philanthropy in general, which also includes a little bit about Helen!

Nassau County Museum of Art: Touring the Grounds in Preparation…

A photo of a scout photographing a site while Jean Henning surveys the brush

Above is a photo of my Life Scout son, Max and my dear friend Jean Henning on the grounds of the Nassau County Museum of Art. They’re considering how they might craft an Eagle Scout Project that provides a gateway to a larger grasslands restoration endeavor. A primary objective will be to educate visitors about the local ecosystem, sustainable landscaping, and the need to address damage already completely out of hand.

It is a HUGE delight to me that, somehow, I don’t think I ever thought of the Museum as we brainstormed potential projects. Max remembered it himself from childhood and found Jean’s email address on the website. I am thrilled that for Jean the timing happens to be perfect. It is wonderful to witness them consulting. My job remains to hold myself back and just watch them work.

It is not easy! I am glad I get to help a little and am consoling myself by happily getting to tell the story.

Jean Henning

When I first met Jean in 2008 she was both the former Museum Educator and the Senior Museum Educator of the Nassau County Museum of Art. She told me this meant she was actually slowly retiring. Together with Patricia Lannes, they were guiding school children, general visitors, docents and others through incredible arrays of exhibitions.

In addition to art, art history and cultural understanding, they were developing observation, discourse and diverse “21st Century Learning Skills” with visiting school children from all over Long Island. They taught me a great deal about the value of BOCES as a vehicle for their deeply enriching school field trips, and cutting edge thought in teaching and learning. A primary focus involved groundbreaking programs using art as a vehicle to English Language Literacy. There was much more. She was always good for an interesting conversation! Among her favorite topics were the grounds themselves.

Jean assures me she is still slowly retiring, “Honestly, I hardly even go into the building anymore. I thought I’d miss teaching in the galleries but, while I really loved it, I find I have other things to do now.”

Photo looking up at the Nassau County Museum of Art in 2016
Photo looking up at the Nassau County Museum of Art in 2016

The Nassau County Museum of Art

The Museum has been an independent 501(c)3 not-for-profit since 1989. It occupies a late 19th century neo‐Georgian mansion on 144 acres in Roslyn Harbor. The property’s first owner was poet and longtime NY Evening Post Editor William Cullen Bryant. The mansion was built by US Representative Lloyd Stephens Bryce. It was all later purchased by US Steel Corporation Founder Henry Clay Frick, though it was his son, Childs Frick, a well-known paleontologist and naturalist who actually owned it.

The grounds include multiple structures and formal gardens originally designed in the 1920s by Marian Cruger Coffin. She was one of America’s leading landscape architects. The rest involve relatively large parcels of relatively untouched lands that back up to Cedarmere Preserve. There are fields and forests, including a pinetum with over 100 rare species of conifer. There are ravines and ponds. All of it contains diverse plant and wildlife species.  

Photo of Porcelain Berry by Katheryn Laible
Pretty poison Porcelain Berry in my own back yard in late October, 2021. It quickly spreads to strangle trees... If you've ever seen Stranger Things, it's root network is reminiscent...

Rare Species...and Invasive Ones: Moving From Preservation to Stewardship

“Honestly, it’s now a catalogue of invasive species.” Jean notes with a grim look as she guides us on a survey of potential sites. We discuss the bigger picture and note relevant details as Max takes it all in.

She leads us down a path that is much wider than I remember.

“COVID” she says, seeing my expression, “SO many people came here walking. I hope they keep it up. They created some really great paths. It’s actually helping us get inside and see what’s going on.”

She navigates under a large fallen tree noting that it’s, “good exercise for people, especially someone my age.” As we go along, she shares resources she’s gathered and what she’s learned since she really got to focus on this.

Jean reflects that while the problems associated with invasive species have been developing under our noses for decades, solving them is something of a new field. Dealing with it all is a process of debate and experimentation. So far, there’s been a lot of mowing and letting-growing. She’s long been determined to minimize the use of poisons, but also knows many are recommending thoughtful applications. She considers that a bit as she eyes some of the more intractably infested areas.

A main focus has been the pretty poison that is Porcelain Berry. English Ivy, and Multiflora Rose run amuck. As she points her plant app at species she’s unsure of, some results make her smile. Others furrow her brow.

She makes it clear that if the gateway garden Max plants could actively replace invasive species, that would be wonderful. Max responds that weeding would be considered more of a Service Project than an Eagle one, but he agrees with the need and will see what he can do.

We discuss wonderful volunteers. She lights up and tells me she’s learned something heartening from a biologist she’s been consulting:

“He tells me that in the ground are living seeds representing a record of 100 years.” She explains further about this wonderful news: The Earth is a living seed bank, especially in these undisturbed lands. If the now smothering invasives are removed, diverse native species, rare ones even, may spring up as payout.

 

Photo of unfurling fern in my backyard, May 2022
Photo of unfurling fern in my backyard, May 2022

Fun to Watch This Take Off

Jean points out spots where she’s witnessing a reemergence already, delighting at ferns with slowly unrolling fronds. Pulling out her phone again, she recommences indentifying things along the edges of land they’ve been reclaiming.

As she finishes the tour, Max offers a few of his evolving thoughts. He explains a bit about his project application process, and how he’ll next consult with the Scout Master and Eagle Coach. He tells her a main purpose of the project is not just to build something for the community, but to exhibit leadership, project management and community connection. He notes there are other scouts who have been intrigued by his ideas. They brainstorm a few options…

It’s going to be fun to see where this goes.

A photo taken of an ascending eagle in Georgeton, Maine in 2015
A photo taken of an ascending eagle in Georgeton, Maine in 2015. Have you seen the ones in Centerport?

For more information on sustainable landscaping, check out our full list of Native Garden and Ecolandscaping Resources. We look forward to adding information on the Museum’s projects and others we’ve come across soon!

Firefly Lights: Great Classes, Local Art, Lovely Artists!

The Firefly Artists Logo

Thank you for making us the 2022 Best Art Gallery on Long Island!

We’re located at 162 Main Street, in beautiful downtown Northport. In this installment please find:

– Exquisite Local Art for Sale by our Fireflies
– Special Exhibitions: “Honey I Shrunk the Art!” and “Reflections”
– Call to Artists: BIG INK
– Classes: Nuno Felting, Acting, Calligraffiti, Jewelry Making, Illustration
– 3-day Workshop with Watercolor Master Fabio Cembranelli
– Featured Guest: LI’s Best
– Featured Firefly: Michelle Schroeder

Photo of handcrafted mirror by Rebecca Bahr
Digitally enhanced photograph of a bicycle by Steve Caputo
Painting of Northport Dock by Jo-Ann Corretti

Clockwise from top: a hopeful illustration from Firefly Helen Murdock-Prep, a beautiful pieced-together mirror by Firefly Rebecca Bahr, The Northport Dock by Firefly Jo-Ann Corretti, bicycle by Firefly Steve Caputo. Below: a tranquil sailboat by Firefly Kirk Larsen, mermaid by Firefly Darnel Tasker.

The Sun is Out! Come Savor our Village and Get Your Art On!!!

Our Fireflies work like busy bees to create, to teach, to make life sweet! Come find that perfect thing to brighten your world or someone else’s.

Located at 162 Main Street, Northport
We’re open:
Tues – Thurs, 11am-6pm
Fri and Sat 11am-8pm (late!)
Sunday 11-5


painting of a moored sailboat by Kirk Larsen
Mermaid illlustration by Darnel Tasker
SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS
Honey I Shrunk the Art logo
Photo entitled "Late Autumn" by Joe Papagoda

Now on view in our upstairs Darcy Arts Center*: Honey I Shrunk the Art

Artists from throughout the region have sent us a treasure trove of tiny delights. Catch them before they leave!

The show is on view April 30-May 29. All works are for sale.

*Please Note:There is no handicapped access to our Darcy Arts Center as it is located on the second floor of the historic building that houses our gallery.
Artwork by Dan Welden

Artwork by Dan Welden

Up Next: "Reflections" by Dan Welden and Greg Corn

Join us for a very special exhibition of works by world renowned Printmaker Dan Welden and Sculptor Greg Corn.
 
The show will be on view: June 11-July 15
A reception will be held: June 18, 5-7pm
 

All works are for sale. Additional pieces may be found at The Omni Gallery, 333 Earl Ovington Blvd, Uniondale from April 25 to August 27, with a reception August 7 at 7:30pm. 

*Please Note:There is no handicapped access to our Darcy Arts Center as it is located on the second floor of the historic building that houses our gallery.

CALL TO ARTISTS

BIG INK is Coming! We Can't Wait!!!

This August will mark the third time we get to host BIG INK and its incredible large-scale printing press, “The Big Tuna.”  It’s a fantastic event for participants and onlookers alike. Those who participate must be prepared to carve a woodblock at least 24″ x 36″.
 
The call can be found on our website. Please read it carefully and note that the print dates have changed to August 20-21! No prior printmaking experience is necessary.
 
Artists of all skill levels are encouraged to apply. First, you submit a design. Accepted work is evaluated on the applicant’s ability to complete the project based on the complexity and scale of the proposed carving.
 
Collaborations are welcome. If accepted, your application fee will go toward the printing cost. You then get two months to carve, the thrill of the printing party, and the satisfaction of seeing your work hanging in our upstairs Darcy Arts Center for a late-summer exhibition.

 

It’s a great time!

Photo of Theo Lau revealing Jim Darcy's BIG INK print
FIREFLY CLASSES
photo of felted flower by Oksana Danziger

Nuno Felting with Firefly Oksana Danziger to Benefit Ukraine Charity

Felting is a user-friendly technique that is simple to learn and create with. Popular projects include decorative pillows, quilts and jewelry. Here, Firefly Oksana Danziger will teach the technique, leading you to bring home a beautiful felted flower! 

THIS FRIDAY: May 20, 3-5pm
To Register: Email Firefly Oksana Danziger: danzigeroksana@gmail.com
 

Oksana is a Russian of Ukrainian descent who cares deeply about the the ongoing war. She tells us she will donate all proceeds from this next class to benefit the Kharkiv Regional Charitable Foundation “Conference of St. Vincent de Paul, which is now dedicated to evacuating refugees from the war zone and collecting humanitarian supplies.

Acting Out! Adult Acting Classes

Acting Out! with Firefly Helen Murdock Prep

Come join Firefly Artist and Theater Educator Helen Murdock-Prep for lots of fun exploring the wonderful world of acting in this workshop featuring Improv, Monologues and Scenes.

When: Tuesday, June 7th; 6:30p-8:30pm
Course Fee: $50

To register, please email Helen at hmurdock@optonline.net

"Firefly" writted in Calligraffiti

Calligraffiti with Firefly Helen Murdock-Prep

Folks have had so much fun with Helen learning this fine art of beautiful handwriting. Here’s another chance to learn!
 
When: Wednesday, June 8, 6:30p-8:30pm
To Register: Please contact Firefly Artist Helen Murdock-Prep: hmurdock@optonline.net. The class fee is $50.
Metalstamping Sample
Metalsmithing Sample

Jewelry Making Classes with Firefly Rachel Kalina

Learn to craft your own jewelry! You can see Firefly Rachel Kalina’s beautiful work at instagram.com/thewoodandwatch. She has more than two decades of experience and has taught students across Long Island. She looks forward to working with you!

 

Metal Stamping 
When:
June 15, 6:00-8:00pm
Class Fee: $74

Learn to hammer a short quote, song lyric, or special name onto metal. Fee includes all materials and tool usage.

 
Beginner Metalsmithing for Adults
When: June 22 and June 29, 6:00-8:00pm (this is a 2-session, 4 hours total course)
Class Fee: $215

A great place to begin metalsmithing! Design and create a pendant or earrings in copper or brass. Cut shapes from sheet metal with a jeweler’s saw. Add texture, patina, and/or metal stamp patterns. Professionally finish your work to be comfortably worn. Fee includes all metal sheet, wire, and findings are included as is tool usage. Note: There are no torches in this class. However, it is a prerequisite for any future soldering or stone setting classes.

 
For More Info and to Register: Email Rachel Kalina at rachelkalina@gmail.com. Classes are open to adults ages 18 and older. Masks are preferred.
Image of "The Cat Came Back" book cover by Renee Reichert

Intro to Illustration with Firefly Renee Reichert

Join Firefly Teaching Artist Renée Reichert in exploring “What is Illustration?” through the art of professional illustrators. Elements of design, color theory and the relationship between images and text will be discussed. Students will create their own illustration using their choice of media and style.

 

“What is Illustration? with Firefly Renée Reichert
When: July 30th and August 6th, 9:30am-12:00pm
Course fee: $100 for the two sessions
To Rgister: Email Renée Reichert at reneereichert@icloud.com

 

Award winning artist and illustrator Renée Reichert is known for lush velvety pastels which often take on both a narrative and a fantasy quality. Her work has been exhibited in The Society of Illustrator’s Annual Exhibition, Spectrum 8: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art and can be seen in numerous private collections. She is the illustrator of the children’s picture books This is the Wind and The Cat Came Back.

artist sample by Fabio Cembranelli

Up Next in our Watercolor Masters Series: Fabio Cembranelli's "Intuitive Approaches to Watercolor"

Firefly Jan Guarino is an ever learning watercolorist and teacher with a passion for bringing the best in her craft to teach at the Firefly. These intensive workshops are incredible. In this next installment, Fabio Cembranelli will come to us from São Paulo, Brazil to guide artists in developing loose and intuitive watercolor techniques, enhancing their own personal approach. Join us!

Fabio Cembranelli: Intuitive Approaches to Watercolor
When: Tues-Thurs July 19-21, 10am-4pm
Workshop Fee: $525 for the three-day session
To Learn More and Reserve Your Space: Visit our website

A renowned Brazilian artist, Fabio teaches all over the world. Nowadays his work is focused on plein air painting, observing and studying nature firsthand at inspiring outdoor locations. This workshop will include a number of demonstrations and promises to touch on a number of valuable aspects, such a composition, light and shadow, color mixing and other techniques. It will provide deep insight into how the artist achieves his unique and luminous floral watercolours
FEATURED FIREFLY
Photos of Students from Heckscher LI Best

Featured Firefly: The Student Artists of LI's Best

Ok, These high school students from throughout Long Island are not Fireflies — YET — but they’re absolutely amazing. We got to give three of them scholarships! Those talented winners and a number of honorable mentions WILL be coming to our Darcy Arts Center this June.
 
Heartfelt to congrats,to our 2022 Firefly Artists “Next Generation” Scholarship RecipientsJustine Blaine, Yuyu Liu and Zhezhong Yu!!!
 
The works are technically proficient and deeply profound. Do check our this Long Island’s Best show in its entirety at the Heckscher Museum if you can. It was really hard for them to select works for that show and next to impossible for us to choose our own winners.

They give us high hopes for the future!

Photo provided by Firefly Michelle Schroeder:  “Healing happening—-one day at a time”

Featured Firefly: Michelle Schroeder

Among treasures in our gallery are works of Firefly Michelle Schroeder. She’s the one who makes those AMAZING handbags out of old LP record albums. She also happens to be central to the community of art teachers that stretches across NY State, including some very special connections with our own robust community here at and around our nurturing gallery.

Michelle is a wonderful person who can often be found rallying good energy for some important cause. While very near to our hearts, unlike the rest of our Fireflies, she is not so local to Long Island.

Actually, Michelle is a High School Art Teacher in Buffalo. Like so many, she is reeling herself right now, but even moreso giving it her best to share information, to help those in need, and to provide her deeply shaken students healing, one day at a time.

We wish she didn’t have to do it, but we are grateful that she does. We love you, Michelle.

The Firefly Artists

About the Firefly Artists

We are located at 162 Main Street in beautiful downtown Northport. Our galleries are open:
Tues-Thurs 11am-6pm  
Fri-Sat 11am-8pm  
Sun 11am-5pm

Over the past decade, The Firefly Artists has had the great privilege of displaying a stunning variety of work by hundreds of Long Island artists through our Main Street locations and pop-up galleries in the community. We boast some extraordinary talent, while maintaining a very down to earth and supportive atmosphere that is unique to Long Island.

We were established in 2011 to create a gallery setting for local artists. The goal was to create a space where artists could meet, collaborate, and sell their beautiful creations.

In 2020 we expanded our gallery by creating the Darcy Arts Center on the second floor of our building. This beautiful gallery space is rich in natural light and dedicated to special exhibitions and art workshops featuring world renowned instructors.We are eager to continue to be an outlet for local artists, offering a place to create, grow and connect to customers.

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram, and check our website for all the latest updates!

Thank you for your support!

Synchronicity Open Doors Reception Featuring Lionel Chitty

Invitation information available in body text

Join us for our first ever “Open Doors Reception”

This will be an evening of networking, light refreshments and good fun. It will be held at The Firefly Artists Gallery in the beautiful historic village of Northport, home of the Engeman Theater, excellent restaurants, lovely shops and a gorgeous park and harbor.

The shops mostly close around 6pm but a few of us, like our neighbors at Artisan House, like to stay open.

 

What: Synchronicity Open Doors Reception
Honoring: Lionel Chitty as nominated by Lois Howes
When: Thursday, May 26th at 6pm
Where: The Firefly Artists, 162 Main St., Northport
Please RSVP: to katelaible@gmail.com Space is limited!
 
 

A Little Bit About Lionel

Here, we will celebrate community and make good connections with a special focus on our friend Lionel Chitty.

Lionel is now the Executive Director of the Nassau County Office of Minority Affairs and, by the way, just found out he’s also about to receive a much cooler honor than this. Stay tuned!!!

When I met Lionel, He lived out east, worked out west and was deeply involved in the Hicksville Chamber of Commerce. I met him through Vision Long Island, who reaches out to and builds community with local business folk across Long Island.

One of the very first things Lionel Chitty ever told me was that he was about to prepare me to never forget his name.

“Are you ready?” he asked.

“Go for it,” I chuckled dubiously.

“Lionel Richie.

Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang.”

…and that sums up a good little bit of what I love about this guy.

Lois Howes

Vision may have been where Lionel met Lois, whom I just call “The Queen of Freeport” to keep things simple. She’s a wonderful local travel agent who was involved with the Chamber…and the Arts Council…and a few other things here and there…She perhaps got most deeply involved with Vision as a champion of the “Friends of Freeport,” a community organization that, a decade later, is still gathering neighbors to assist neighbors in recovering from Superstorm Sandy.

We’re looking forward to this being a first of many lovely evenings bringing people together at a beautiful place in the name of human connection.

Hope you can pop in! Please RSVP ASAP as space is limited. Have a wonderful day!

Image of event invitation. Details are in the body of the text.

Northport Native Garden Initiative: Building Community, Healing Our World, One Plant at a Time

Photo of Nicole Tamaro, Matt Goreman and Sara Abbass at the 2nd Annual Northport Native Garden Initiative Plant Sale

Northport Native Garden Initiative Co-Founders at their second annual Native Plant Sale. From Left: Nicole Tamaro, Matt Gorman and Sara Abbass.

Photo Credit: Meghan Fisk

Meeting a Northport Native Garden Initiative Founder: A Very Busy Bee!

I met Sara Abbass when she came into The Firefly Artists one day in early 2021. She was walking around the Village of Northport sharing a cool fundraiser for the Ocean Ave Elementary School PTA. The endeavor was designed to also support local businesses, and to be a booster for the masks that were helping us all get to be a little more human again.

We soon started brainstorming children’s art classes. Somehow, we got onto plants. She then shared a really cool idea of an organization she’d helped start with some friends that seemed to set a fire behind her eyes: The Northport Native Garden Initiative (NNGI).

The next time I saw her, Drigo Morin and I were at the monthly Northport Village Board meeting to inquire about Plein Air. She and Trustees were excited about a demonstration garden of native plants that they were installing at Village Hall, right there on Main Street.

Buzzing About the Second Annual Native Plant Sale

Now. Wow. The first thing I see when I come to get my plants and help out at the 2nd Annual NNGI Spring Plant Sale is a table in the driveway manned by kids and a sweet black dog. They’re selling lemonade, cookies and other treats to raise money for Grateful Greys an organization that serves Greyhounds. They tell me they have a $300 goal and are pleased to report that they’ve already earned well over $200.

Around back is a yard full of plant orders, several tables filled with specimens not yet spoken for, and a bunch of busy bee volunteers helping folks find what they are seeking.

“This is nothing,” one tells me, “Before, the whole yard was filled. It’s so much bigger than last year!”

Nicole Tamaro, another co-founder, provides a quick rundown of a nicely organized setup. She then directs us to wagons, and leads us to find our own orders. We laugh at the irony that the Iron Weed will be late because the spring has been so cool, but today is more like muggy July.

Mostly, though, conversation swirls about the large variety of plants they are fetching and brainstorming with neighbors as they guide them in placement and care. Honeysuckle and certain ferns are in short supply – everywhere. They ponder solutions and earnestly brainstorm other options.

A photo of my wagon of plants.
Part of my Northport Native Garden Initiative haul: A native honeysuckle I was luckier to get than I knew, and two switchgrasses to replace some pulled invasives -- Can't wait to get these guys into the ground!

The Hard Work is Paying Off!

“We are so happy people have been so receptive and that this is taking off,” says Sara when she finally has a moment to recognize me and chat. She laughs at how tired she is. This exceptionally multitasking mother usually does manage to get her sleep, which is wonderful, thank you, but last night they came home exhausted and exhilarated. They finally crashed and then sprung up to do it all over again!

She doesn’t look tired, though. None of them do. They’re having a good time and thrilled that their efforts to help folks make more thoughtful landscaping choices seems to be making a difference. 

“Until you know, you don’t know,” says Sara, “and you can’t learn unless there are folks willing to teach.” She looks at me, “That’s why we’re so committed to offering lectures ourselves, and to bringing in outside speakers so we all can learn more.”

NNGI Co-Founder Nicole Tamaro educated attendees about their native gardening options.

Not Just Natives

They’ve been to schools, churches and libraries, spreading their passion for ecologically friendly yards. The native plants are a huge part. “But it’s more than that,” says Sara. “It also involves things like offering homes for mason bees, understanding the need for storm water mitigation, thinking about things like light pollution, and…just pausing to think about how what we do and how we choose to landscape impacts the health and well being of the world around us.”
 

In addition to serving neighbors yards, they’ve also raised and matched funds to seed oysters that will help filter the water in Northport Harbor. The truth is, we live on a densely populated island of many harbors and depend on our groundwater. How we live impacts all of that for generations, and there’s already great damage to repair. It’s a lot to deal with, and it’s nice to know there’s something folks can do that makes a difference, one yard at a time: Ecologically supportive landscaping.

“Rain gardens are great!” says Sara, “So are plants that have deeper root systems, because they provide filtration of what’s going into the ground.” There are so many things. Our conversation turns from problems to solutions as we share love and wonder for plants and she hurries to tend to the event.
 
“I say it all the time,” she says, “Let’s get jazzed about plants!”
 
I am totally jazzed.

A bit of Matt's Garden and his Gazebo with Plant Sale activity in the background.
A bit of Matt's Garden and his gazebo with plant sale activity in the background.

Garden Tour

As Sara and others offer guidance to customers regarding their selections, another co-founder named Matt Gorman offers an informative tour of his own increasingly diverse native gardens. He shows me native Blueberries and Joe Pye Weed, Goldenrod and New England asters.

“The Chokeberry is aptly named,” he says, pointing to a plant with beautiful clusters of white blossoms.

“Oh, yeah?” I say, “Is it toxic?”

“No, but if you eat them when they first ripen they will really pucker your mouth.” His eyes gleam, “You can make good jam out of them, though.” He explains they’re actually considered a “superfood” with nearly twice as many antioxidants as blueberries.

He indicates native honeysuckle and clematis vining around the gazebo, talking about how the slightly different conditions on either side of the structure impact growth. Then, he shows me one of his favorite elements: Little birdhouses filled with bamboo that mason bees are busily entering and exiting.

 

photo of Mason Bee House
A Mason Bee House peacefully hangs out on the gazebo in Matt Goreman's garden.

Love the Pollinators...

“We got these guys as cocoons,” he smiles. The Initiative has a workshop they ran with Blossom Meadow Farm about these important pollinators on their website. There’s also a 101 on native gardening. Once they get through the sale, they’ll upload more.

“I loving hanging out with my bees,” I say, “but I’m surprised you have them right here on the gazebo.”

“They won’t hurt anyone,” he answers, “The males don’t even have stingers. The females….you basically have to squeeze them to get them to sting you. They’ve got better things to do than bother us.”

He is a fount of information and clearly totally jazzed about his plants. “How’d you get into this?” I ask.

“It all started with some Butterfly Milkweed I got. I noticed how many pollinators it attracted and I just started thinking…what else could I add? I started researching, and bringing things in…pretty soon I had a lot of native plants and SO much wildlife in my yard. Birds, bees, butterflies, more…it’s really cool.”

Photo of Chokeberry Blossoms

Professional Design Services

I marvel at one particularly large order in the yard. It’s going to a client’s home in Asharoken for, in addition to the non-profit, Sara has now founded Sara Mairéad Landscape Design, Inc.

“It is so much fun to design for different areas,” she says, “Full sun is easy. I like hard to plant spots and hard to find plants.”

“Woodlands may be my favorite,” she continues, “I love taking areas where people say, ‘I can’t do anything with this’ and creating something special.”

“I love naming them, too. ‘Woodland Oasis…” you can see she might start to daydream, but she quickly turns earnest, “I try to bring it all to a different level, to create a really good feeling for clients…one that gets them excited and invested, too.”

Photo of Native Plants

Building Community

Although they are very locally focused on their Northport community, the NNGI is also totally jazzed about the partners they have found to jam with in their endeavors. They mention Kimberly of KMS Plants, who supplies much of their inventory, as well as others they have befriended. In addition to a very active Facebook page the group is really happy about their new website, which empowers them to host all sorts of information.

“You know what I think is the coolest thing about that?” asks Nicole, “We’ve now got an interactive map where people can add themselves and tell us how many native plants they have.”

“Why do you love it?” I ask

“Because it shows people how involved others are becoming in this, and how even one yard can make an impact. It connects our community through native plants.”

While gardens are often places of delicious solitude, they are also community touchstones. You can see it in the friendships here and on their map. It is evident in the folks they are connecting with and amplifying island- and even nation-wide. You can find it right here in their conversations with neighbors seeking guidance, who are talking to each other as much as to the busily working friends, family and volunteers.

It is clearly evident that they are totally jazzed, and making their deepest difference one yard, one plant, one person at a time.  

It’s really cool.  Check ‘em out.

For more information on sustainable landscaping, check out our full list of Native Garden and Ecolandscaping Resources, It has just been updated to now also include contact information for Sara Mairéad Landscape Design, Inc.

In Memoriam: Ken Christensen

From Left: Ken Christensen, Libby Hubbard, Craig Riger, Dianne Parker, Lou Giordano at a Leadership Huntignton Founders Dinner in 2014

“The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit.” ~Google tells me this quote is attributed to Nelson Henderson but to me it belongs to Ken Christensen, who spoke those words often and took them deeply to heart.

Continue reading

Moonjumpers Partner with Six Harbors Brewery to Serve Little Shelter and Angels of Warriors

Monnjumpers Mash Pale Ale Beercan Lable

The Moonjumpers have partnered with Six Harbors Brewery on a new craft beer, The label, shown above, was designed by Emma DeDora. She’s a cousin of Six Harbors Co-Owner Karen Heuwetter. Featured among the dogs is Moonjumper Co-Founder Rob Benson’s dear friend Cliff, who is himself a rescue from the Little Shelter.

Event Alert: Moonjumpers Charitable Foundation Partners with Six Harbors Brewery to Make Good Times Great Times by Serving the Little Shelter and Angels of Warriors​

A driving idea, from the very founding of the Moonjumpers Charitable Foundation is that a good time becomes a great time when people come together to help others. For more than ten years now, the Moonjumpers have served “children, families, war veterans and charitable and not-for-profit organizations through financial assistance and the purchase of products or equipment so as to aid in creating a better quality of life for those in need.”

Their merry endeavor includes a theme song, a dog named Cliff, and a passion for good fellowship and community partnerships. They tend to have a really good time even when they’re simply offering a financial donation or providing a direct service, such as rolling up their sleeves to help associates serve veterans or spearheading a coat drive to support the community served by a local youth organization.

They like it best, though, when they can really make a party of it. It’s been tough these last few years, but they are on it and hope you will join them in a really cool partnership with Six Harbors Brewing Company:

What: Stop on in for the unveiling of a new beer and beer can design for this “Moonjumpers Mash Pale Hale” to be available at Six Harbors Brewing Company.
 
Benefitting: A portion of proceeds from the sale of this beer will be donated to Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption.
 
When: May 19, 2022, from 5-8pm.
 
What: Moonjumpers and friends are among sponsors of this event. Ten North Shore Breweries will offer samples of their beverages from 1-4pm. Ticket holders will receive a commemorative glass and enjoy music from a steel drum band, delicious food, vendors, and fun activities.
 
Benefitting: Proceeds from the event will be donated to Angels of Warriors, which serves local female veterans in need. In addition, a portion of proceeds from all sales of the Moonjumpers Mash Pale Ale will be donated to Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption.
 
When: Saturday, June 11, 2022 (rain date Saturday, June 25, 2022).
 
To Register: General admission, VIP tickets and more information are available here.
 

Both events will be held at Six Harbors Brewing Company, 243 New York Avenue, Huntington

Fun Stuff!!!

Firefly Reception: Honey I Shrunk the Art!

Honey I Shrunk the Art logo
Join us Firefly Artists this Sunday, May 1st from 12-5pm for a reception for “Honey I Shrunk the Art!”  I love this gallery and the people who make up our community-oriented family of local artists. It’s a very special place. Come see!!!
 
Our work is cut out for us!!! This week we hang over 220 little pieces in our upstairs Darcy Arts Center*. This annual celebration of small works is incredible. It has been pure delight to welcome them in. 
 
The show will be on view April 30th through May 29th.  Between these sweet pieces and everything we have going on in our Main Firefly Gallery, we are just the right place to find that perfect gift for Mothers Day!
  

*Please Note: There is no handicapped access to our Darcy Arts Center as it is located on the second floor of the historic building that houses our gallery.

About The Firefly

The Firefly Artists was established in 2011 to create a gallery setting for local artists. It is a space where artists can meet, collaborate, and sell their beautiful creations. Over the past decade, we have been privileged to display a stunning variety of work by hundreds of local and regional artists, both in our Main Street locations and in pop-up galleries throughout the community.

We boast some extraordinary talent, while maintaining a very down to earth and supportive atmosphere that is unique on Long Island. Every time you shop at The Firefly, you help make sure we can continue to serve local artists and people like you who appreciate them. Now, you’ve made us the Best Art Gallery on Long Island. Thank you!!!

How to Help Ukraine

Pop art photo of sunflowers

Help Ukraine: Proceeds from sales of this print “Technicolor Sunflower Vibrations” by Katheryn Laible (available at the Firefly Artists in Northport) will be directed to CARE.

Below is a list of ways we might help people impacted by the war in Ukraine.
 
The assault by Russia is a heartbreaking atrocity that many somehow thought Europe was now beyond. As we pray for all involved…which really is everybody at the very least due to our intricately woven economies…I hope it also brings us to see people from other war-torn circumstances with more compassion and recognition of our shared humanity.
 
Fascinating conversations with folks I might think of as “more foreign to me” have underlined this deeply. I am ever grateful to live in such a melting pot where I can look so many different folks in the eye and hear their perspectives. Now that we’re able to gather intimately with strangers again, I realize how very much I’ve missed this, and how deeply valuable it is.
 
They and others remind me to reflect on how very precious things we may take for granted here are; to recognize that this conflict is at least in some deep way about fundamental values we as a Nation have managed to secularly enshrine: Freedoms of conscience and expression. A right to self determination. The basic human right for civilians to live in peace. The fact that for whatever we may have to criticize about ourselves — and, yes, we do have our fair share! —  the very fact that we get to do so as robustly as we will is a valuable privilege too many do not have. 
 
It makes me think about so many things we squabble about at home — and also makes me think about how…while we are far from perfect…our role as a “beacon of light” for so many people the world over has been important. It doesn’t make us as individuals any better than other people, but it does point to some very special things we have managed to achieve and still remain a steward and champion of, if we will take that responsibility. 
 
As our dear Founding Father, an incredible if also very human being, Benjamin Franklin, famously said: We have “a Republic. If you will keep it.”
 
It makes me wonder: If we don’t continue to champion the inalienable rights and noble ideals this nation was founded upon and that so many have fought to more fully realize, then who will? Who possibly could? It helps me get my own priorities in order, even as I’m not entirely sure how to reconcile my fundamental principles into this on beyond wired new world…
 
The term “freedom isn’t free” comes to mind from a number of different perspectives as I am struck by how these ideals may be undermined not only by sometimes violent censorship, but also by active disinformation and practical concerns.  I am concurrently profoundly moved by how very hard people who really know the value of these rights will fight to maintain them, or determine to assert them anyway, despite even the most pressing of practical concerns.
 
We are witnessing incredible stories of resilience and determination among the Ukrainians, as well as among people who stand to support them, including from within Russia itself. At the same time, we are also forced to reckon with the fact that there are people — some of whom wield incredible power — that seem to have no regard whatsoever for innocent human lives, let alone our noble ideals. All the while, we are once again getting to fairly directly experience how deeply interconnected we are, how much it costs to dance with the devil, and how exceptionally difficult it can be to know the best course through things, even when guided by the best of intentions…
 
At the limits of my human capacity to effect change for the better, I pray. For the people of Ukraine. For the people of Russia. For my dear, dear nation and for this whole world we share. May we somehow come through this time better than we were before.
 
Here is a collection of resources for those who’d like to better understand and to help the people impacted by this war. Grateful thanks to all who live to make things better:
 
Tips on dealing with difficult news stories

“5 Tips for Dealing with War in Ukraine News Coverage” from the Fair Media council.

How to talk to your kids about the war in Ukraine (And other tough topics)” from the Long Island Press

 
Some Analyses of the situation

Why Has Russia Invaded Ukraine and What Does Putin Want?” from the BBC

The Grid is “a collaborative newsroom of beat reporters, subject editors and data journalists who work together to show how the areas we cover are interconnected.” It’s quite a way to take in the situation.

 

Insights from the Harvard Kennedy School

NPR and WNYC have been covering disinformation campaigns and their responses in the region for quite some time. It’s a really important topic. Here’s a more general series on Untangling Disinformation from NPR.

Here at home is a a story in Newsday about one Long Island family (subscription required) who has taken in childhood friends from Ukraine.

 
Ways You Can Help
This a sampling of resources. As always, it is strongly recommended that folks research to make sure that whatever they donate to is a reputable organization that aligns with their values.
 

The Long Island Community Foundation provides a list of well-vetted organizations to help refugee and humanitarian efforts related to the war.

Solidarity with Ukraine” from LI Business News (subscription required) reports on a number of local efforts. It also includes links to support an endeavor by Northwell Health in partnership with Doctors Without Borders, as well as funds created by the National Bank of Ukraine, Razom for Ukraine and HIAS in Ukraine

#United for Ukraine: You can find out about this United Way Global effort through the United Way of Long Island and how you can support United Way’s vetted, nonpartisan partners on the ground, including United Way Romania, United Way Hungary and Fundacja Dobrych Inicjatyw (Good Initiatives Foundation) in Poland.”
 

23 Ways you can help Ukraine right now from TimeOuthere.com

30 Meaningful Ways to Help Ukraine from Global Citizen

 
A Few Hyper-Local Efforts

Your school, your church, your office, you local watering hole may be doing something. I’d love to hear about it! Here are a few lovely things we’ve noticed:

Three Places on Long Island to Donate to Aid Ukraine” by LongIsland.com. A Babylon effort, an Islip effort and a Long Islander who was born in Ukraine who is channeling donations

“Artists on East End put work up for auction to raise money for Ukraine” (subscription required) from Newsday. The auction, “Artists for Ukraine” will donate every penny of sales. It’s happening this weekend at “The Church” in Sag Harbor

East End: Main Prospect making dishes to help Ukrainian people” from News12 Long Island, this is a report on a Southampton restaurant that’s already raised over $10,000 making authentic Ukrainian dishes.

Artisans from the Nest on Main in Northport have come together to offer “The Sunflower Collection.” Proceeds from this collection will be donated to Ukrainian relief efforts through World Central Kitchen.

Paws of War in Nesconset have this on their website: “Since 2014, we have brought over 300 dogs and cats, rescued by our troops serving overseas to safety in the U.S. We have provided 100’s of Veterans with service and support dogs rescued from kill shelters.” Now they have a huge focus on Ukraine.
 
 
Magnet from local school Russian Club
"The Russian Club at school was selling these to help people in Ukraine," my son told me. "I thought you'd appreciate that so I got you one." I do. Thanks.