Synchronicity Open Doors Reception Featuring Lionel Chitty

Invitation information available in body text

Join us for our first ever “Open Doors Reception”

This will be an evening of networking, light refreshments and good fun. It will be held at The Firefly Artists Gallery in the beautiful historic village of Northport, home of the Engeman Theater, excellent restaurants, lovely shops and a gorgeous park and harbor.

The shops mostly close around 6pm but a few of us, like our neighbors at Artisan House, like to stay open.

 

What: Synchronicity Open Doors Reception
Honoring: Lionel Chitty as nominated by Lois Howes
When: Thursday, May 26th at 6pm
Where: The Firefly Artists, 162 Main St., Northport
Please RSVP: to katelaible@gmail.com Space is limited!
 
 

A Little Bit About Lionel

Here, we will celebrate community and make good connections with a special focus on our friend Lionel Chitty.

Lionel is now the Executive Director of the Nassau County Office of Minority Affairs and, by the way, just found out he’s also about to receive a much cooler honor than this. Stay tuned!!!

When I met Lionel, He lived out east, worked out west and was deeply involved in the Hicksville Chamber of Commerce. I met him through Vision Long Island, who reaches out to and builds community with local business folk across Long Island.

One of the very first things Lionel Chitty ever told me was that he was about to prepare me to never forget his name.

“Are you ready?” he asked.

“Go for it,” I chuckled dubiously.

“Lionel Richie.

Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang.”

…and that sums up a good little bit of what I love about this guy.

Lois Howes

Vision may have been where Lionel met Lois, whom I just call “The Queen of Freeport” to keep things simple. She’s a wonderful local travel agent who was involved with the Chamber…and the Arts Council…and a few other things here and there…She perhaps got most deeply involved with Vision as a champion of the “Friends of Freeport,” a community organization that, a decade later, is still gathering neighbors to assist neighbors in recovering from Superstorm Sandy.

We’re looking forward to this being a first of many lovely evenings bringing people together at a beautiful place in the name of human connection.

Hope you can pop in! Please RSVP ASAP as space is limited. Have a wonderful day!

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Book Review: Small List Big Results by Robbie Samuels

Photo of Small List Big Results with a pencil and a cup of tea.

I recently made a good time investment reading “Small List Big Results” by Robbie Samuels. Here, he shows how it’s not the size of our network, but how we work it that makes the difference, offering “step-by-step guidance on how to wake up your network, discover likely prospects and likely referral partners, co-create the offer, and run a pilot.”

I met Robbie over 20 years ago when he was still figuring out who he was. At that time, he already had it more together than I suspect I ever will. At the same time, he was already helping more people more deeply and more profoundly than I can fathom. What he did for me was probably just day to day being for him. For me it was lifelong priceless…on a multitude of levels.

Robbie is one of the best teachers I have ever experienced. He is exceptionally patient, gracious and empathetic, while at the same time incredibly straight forward, organized and practical. A life-long learner, he is committed to continually improving himself at least as much as anyone else around him. All the while, he shares as he grows.

This latest book, “Small List Big Results” captures all of that. It is honest, open and intensely useful. Here, he brings an incredible wealth of experience, study and personal reflection together to gently yet firmly guide you to reach out to others and determine your best plan of action.

The major thrust is clear, and the strategy clearly articulated at a level of detail that most would gloss over. The golden nuggets he drops in passing are deeply valuable. One might think all this might result in something mildly unwieldy, but it’s a quick read that gets you immediately into action.

I recommend it, and everything else he offers highly.

Robbie was mentioned here before when he leapt out in 2020 to help people create better Zoom experiences. That program has evolved and now has a waiting list. I have also long appreciated his thoughts on Croissants vs. Bagels. Here’s a Tedx Talk on that. You can also follow him on Facebook. His On the Schmooze”  podcast is really good!

Girls Inc. of Long Island: Strong. Smart. Bold.

Kaylin St. Victor, "Girl of the Year" with Girls Inc Executive Director Renee Flagler

It was a privilege to witness Girl’s Inc of Long Island produce their Annual Gala. As an organizational wonk and a human being, I instantly fell in love with these strong, smart, empowering women, the folks they draw into their fold, and their skilled passion for the girls it is their job to nurture.

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Welcome Sponsor! UNI Communications!

We have stories to tell about the wonderful experience we’re having with this organization’s founder, Brandon Palanker. For now, let’s just say we are grateful for his support!!!

UNI (You & I) provides businesses of all shapes and sizes – from start-ups and small businesses to established firms seeking a new direction and enhanced growth – the same quality web design and strategic marketing services previously available only to much larger organizations.

UNI taps its founder’s 20+ years marketing experience with expertise across a full array of industries and business typologies including real estate, municipal governance, technology, small business, restaurant and hospitality, and not-for-profit.

Utilizing a customer-centric, personal approach, UNI matches technology and graphic design capabilities with full service agency experience and professionalism. This grants clients access to industry knowledge and insights rarely available to start-ups, small, and mid-sized businesses. The result is the highest quality web design, branding, and marketing services, all within a budget you can afford. Simply put, websites and branding good enough for the Fortune 500, at a budget you can afford!

Ready to tell YOUR STORY? UNI : Let’s do this together! 

(Let them know we sent you!!!)

The Servant Leader

Photo of Dave Vollmer

I’ve had the fortune to experience leadership from both sides of the fence, both effective and ineffective. In today’s world, so many claim to be good leaders or declare others to be good leaders, but how do we know if that’s true? Do we ask their bosses? Their subordinates? Do we compare them to history’s great leaders? Or do we judge them by their actions?

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Folio Awards Video, Fast Chats with the Fair Media Council

Fair Media Council Logo

We are grateful to all who are carrying on virtually! Here’s some incredibly touching and informative video from The Folio Awards.

While nothing replaces getting to connect with the folks that our sponsor The Fair Media Council normally brings together to highlight the best in local media, the online event was time well spent and we appreciated the virtual networking session held afterward.

Did you know WLIW now has a radio station? That’s how we learned! That and a whole lot more!!!

We are further excited by FMC’s endeavors to adapt and excited about their virtual event lineup featuring notables in news, media and business.

“FMC Fast Chat” is a live talk show on Zoom where the audience drives the conversation by asking questions in advance (during registration) or during the show via the Q&A box. The recorded version becomes a podcast available on the C-Suite Radio Network, as well as iTunes, Google Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher and TuneIn.

Expect real, powerful and relevant conversations with notables in news, media and business that put you in the know in just 30 minutes.

The events are free to attend, but preregistration is necessary to ensure a seat for the live shows.

October 6th: This already occurred but you can sign up for the podcast on The FMC Website: America’s Growing Need for Public Service & Volunteerism with RITA COSBY, Emmy-Winning TV Host, Female Legend of the Year in Radio, Best-Selling Author & Chair, Global Service Institute at LIU

October 27th: GARY VAYNERCHUK, chairman of VaynerX and CEO of VaynerMedia on how to do business right, right now.

November 10th: How did the media cover the Election? That’s the focus of this Fast Chat with BRIAN LEHRER of The Brian Lehrer Show, WNYC.

December 8th: Get the inside skinny on how to get your opinion heard on CNN, directly from CNN Opinion Editor RICHARD GALANT.

To register for any of these shows, please visit www.fairmediacouncil.org

More Fast Chats are continuously added. The best way to stay up-to-date is to sign up for the Fair Media Council’s weekly newsletter, The Latest, which comes out on Thursdays (Be sure to whitelist it).

Subscribe to FMC Fast Chat and you can also hear past episodes featuring Jeffrey Hayzlett, Chair and CEO, C-Suite Network, on how to do business during COVID19; Allison Gilbert, journalist and grief expert, on how to deal with loss and find comfort, and Ben Smith, media columnist, The New York Times, on the state of the news media today.

Community Leadership, Chapter 4: Leadership and the Dianne Parker Direction

Dianne Parker, the original Executive Director of Leadership and the Huntington Township Chamber Foundation with an early dedicated sponsor, Robert Scheiner of H2M Architects & Engineers. Photo by Katheryn Laible

Diversity.

This concept of developing leaders from all groups in a community certainly influenced Dianne Parker’s thinking. Dianne Parker was Executive Director of Leadership Huntington. We must say Dianne is a serious, intelligent business entrepreneur with a love of nature and art. She also has an earnest interest in people and all their cultural diversity.

Over the last 20 years, we have developed a great appreciation of how she crafted the Leadership Program and what she brought to it. One of her most important tenets being diversity of class member’s may lead you to ask, “Why?”

The answer is because it is important to bring people together so they may learn from each other and cross economic, cultural, gender, and educational lines. Many class members have expressed revelations and new understanding of other people and their circumstances while they were in the diversity rich environment of Leadership Huntington. Libby Hubbard, past Chamber Foundation President, commented that the class mix leads to a broader view of the community.

People have at times had an opinion that only those in positions of authority or higher status should go through the program. Those opinions ring hollow in my experience. That limiting concept would hamper the effect of experiential leadership. Many Leadership Huntington graduates have gone on to help build organizations and create non- profits that benefit many folks.

 

Why is diversity important? The answer is because it is important to bring people together so they may learn from each other and cross economic, cultural, gender, and educational lines. Many class members have expressed revelations and new understanding of other people and their circumstances while they were in the diversity rich environment of Leadership Huntington. Libby Hubbard, past Chamber Foundation President, commented that the class mix leads to a broader view of the community.

Larry Kushnick, Esq. Class of ’97, God rest his soul, said Leadership Huntington gave him the confidence to start his own law practice. He also helped get many local organizations started. Another young woman found her own voice and advanced in her family’s business because she now had the confidence to articulate her own worth. She, too, became instrumental to many positive community endeavors. Sometimes, the impact is very personal, which is good because community leadership starts at home. One gentleman in my class remarked, after going through temperament exercises, that he now understood why his wife was so different. Awe, clarification and understanding.

The notion that leaders can be developed, who as a direct result transform communities to be stronger and more effective, is a concept derived from the exploration, experiences and observations of community organizations like the Chamber Foundation and that group of committed individuals. To quote Ken Christensen, past Chamber Foundation member, “everywhere he goes there is a Leadership Huntington grad involved.”

This is very good. Community leadership is critical to building effective, inclusive communities which work for all citizens. It is hard to imagine an effective community which isn’t full of committed, engaged, involved and evolving volunteer leaders, servant leaders, and community trustees.

Change is everywhere. Communities change, issues change, circumstances change, demographics change. Leadership programs must change, too. The program that seems to work today won’t tomorrow. Community education isn’t enough. We must endeavor in an ongoing fashion to equip leaders with skills and processes that will serve them when and wherever they encounter a leadership challenge.

One class a year isn’t enough to create leaderful communities. One format does not fit all. We encourage all with experience and insight to think of yourselves as leadership development arms of your community, and of all the implications for change that concept implies.

Diversity is very important concept, and not an easy one to accomplish, but it makes such a rich learning environment. We have separated ourselves so much over the years we have missed the richness of diversity. One can only hope we may work toward that concept for a rich future.

We hope you can take away some bits of wisdom from the idea of diversity and the concepts that are suggested. Stay tuned, Chapter 5 is next!

Thanks for reading.
Trudy & Craig

This is very good. Community leadership is critical to building effective, inclusive communities which work for all citizens. It is hard to imagine an effective community which isn’t full of committed, engaged, involved and evolving volunteer leaders, servant leaders, and community trustees.

Spencer’s Picks: Overcoming Pandemic Fatigue; Art, Science & Suggested Solutions; The Happiness of a Dog

Dr. Spencer Thomas atop the Uffizi in Florence, Italy

Photo of Dr. Spencer Thomas atop the Uffizi in Florence, Italy. Photo by Katheryn Laible

 

As usual, when he’s not scrying into the mysteries of metals at the atomic level, or pondering puzzles of more efficient means of tapping energy, Dr. Thomas is bringing some light into our life. Here are a few of the things he’s brought to our attention:

Now that we’re about a month into the college semester with social distancing and remote learning, a lot of people I know are feeling a bit of a drag. You are not alone: Lonliness at Pandemic U: 14 tips for college students and their parents

Along similar themes, but more for everyone:: Your Surge Capacity is Depleted. This is Why You Feel Awful (and a couple good things you can do about it)

One thing that’s helpful is — to help! Here is a heartwarming and inspiring story from one of my very favorite professors from back in my undergrad time at Stony Brook. Bente Videbaek is an amazing person who has been working hard to make sure people have masks Facebook Page: “Humans of Mather Hospital”

When you feel a bit grounded and ready to stare some of the bigger challenges facing humanity in the face: Countdown is a global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis. One of the speakers, Dr. Rose Mutiso, is a friend of mine – we were graduate students together. She’s the incredible CEO of the Mawazo Institute, which supports women scientists and leaders throughout East Africa. She has also spoken at TED and written in Scientific American about the challenges that people in Africa face building digital and clean-energy infrastructure.

One for the Coltrane fans out there: The most feared song in jazz, explained. It’s not too hard for a layman to follow this breakdown of “Giant Steps,” even as it’s still among the most challenging things a musician may face

Finally, no big point here, but a bit of joy for you since we could all use it: The happiness of this dog after they put prostheses on

Spencer Thomas received his PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. After some time at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, we are DELIGHTED to welcome him back to Long Island as a researcher at Stony Brook University. He also happens to be Katie’s brother. For a time, Spencer studied metals at the atomic level; the way atoms are arranged in a material can change its properties; one can take ordinary metals make them stronger, more flexible, corrosion resistant, even radiation resistant. We’re still endeavoring to understand what he’s doing now well enough to explain it so simply.

Spencer believes that no matter who you are, good communication can put scientific concepts within reach. The modern world demands scientific literacy and it is the responsibility of scientists to make that possible.